All posts by violet

spatial justice

From Art and criticism : monographs and studies / by Theodore Child (1892)

90th chat, Monday September 18 2017: spatial justice: white supremacy in public art and architecture
6pm Pacific / 7pm Mountain / 8pm Central / 9pm Eastern*
*note special evening Monday time

moderated by @a_meeksie & @vin_alyssa

Definitions:

  • spatial justice: Spatial justice brings together social justice and space. How space is organized (what and who occupies any given space) is a crucial dimension of human societies, reflecting social realities and (in)justices while also influencing social relations (Henri Lefebrve, 1968, 1972). This concept can be used as a guiding tool to understand and reflect on solutions to social injustices that are embedded in both space and society.
  • public art: art in any media that has been planned and executed with the intention of being staged in the physical public domain, usually outside and accessible to all.

Suggested resources:

  • Brook, Freeda, Dave Ellenwood, and Althea Eannace Lazzaro. “In pursuit of antiracist social justice: denaturalizing whiteness in the academic library.” Library Trends 64.2 (2015): 246-284. (especially section on “The racialized space of the academic library” pdf)

Discussion questions:

  • Q1. What is the function of public art and architecture where you work/live? #critlib
  • Q2. What narratives/whose history is dominant in and around lib*/archives in your community? #critlib
  • Q3. If lib* take an antiracist approach to cultivating culturally responsive spaces, what do we need to examine first and why? #critlib
  • Q4. How can we can work to counteract & subvert oppressive spatial elements, such as monuments that function as microaggressions? #critlib
  • Q5. What barriers might we encounter in trying to do this work in our profession & how can we overcome those barriers? #critlib

Additional resources:

the weight and worth of professionalism

black and white photo of a cat wearing cat-sized eyeglasses and a bonnet
From Kittens and cats : a book of tales / Eulalie Osgood Grover (1911)

89th chat, Tuesday September 5 2017: the weight and worth of professionalism
6pm Pacific / 7pm Mountain / 8pm Central / 9pm Eastern

moderated by @TheGnarrator
Storify by @lisahubbell

Suggested resources:

Discussion questions:

  • Q1. What is the culture of professionalism in your workplace? In your area of librarianship?
  • Q2. How do definitions of professionalism differ from the democratic and social values advocated by librarianship?
  • Q3. What are ways that professionalism is oppressive?
  • Q4. How can we cultivate acceptance of different attitudes towards professionalism/redefine professionalism to be more inclusive and accommodating of different experiences/identities?
  • Q5. How do you represent yourself authentically in the workplace or as a job seeker while navigating organizational expectations?

mentorship

black and white photo of a light long-haired cat looking off-camera
From Mammals of other lands / Charles J. Cornish [and others], editors (1917)
88th chat, Wednesday August 23 2017*: mentorship
11am Pacific / noon Mountain / 1pm Central / 2pm Eastern
*please note changed day/date (changed to avoid coinciding with eclipse!)

moderated by @zoh_zoh
Storify by @violetbfox

Suggested readings:

Definitions:

  • mentor: generally an experienced colleague who provides guidance and advice
  • mentee: the person being mentored
  • library workers: anyone who works in libraries in any capacity, including contingent/adjunct/part-time/classified labor
  • formal mentorship programs: mentorship programs organized by an employer, professional association, school/university, non-profit, or other institution
  • informal mentorship: mentoring relationships that are not administered by any outside organization

Discussion questions:

  • Q1. How do you define success in a mentoring relationship?
  • Q2. Have you ever participated in, or do you currently participate in, a formal mentorship program? If so, what is/was it? What was your experience?
  • Q3. What are some informal ways you have mentored, or been mentored by, other library workers?
  • Q4. What are some examples of strong mentorship programs outside of libraries? What can we adapt/change in library mentorship programs?
  • Q5. How can mentorship help surface and transform power structures in library professions?

Hip Hop Librarian Consortium

black and white photo of a tabby cat sitting on a tree branch
From Biggle pet book : a collection of information for old and young whose natural instincts teach them to be kind to all living creatures / by Jacob Biggle (1900)

87th chat, Tuesday August 8 2017: Hip Hop Librarian Consortium
6pm Pacific / 7pm Mountain / 8pm Central / 9pm Eastern

moderated by @KaiAlexisSmith @NicestLibrarian @maxmacias
Storify by @violetbfox

Hip Hop pedagogy is “an examination of the way hip-hop constructs discourse, the way it produces rhetorical meaning through its complex method of digital sampling, and how such a rhetoric functions within the scope of argumentation.” (Jeff Rice, “The 1963 Hip-Hop Machine: Hip-Hop Pedagogy as Composition”, College Composition and Communication (2003), p. 454. Available at: jstor.org/stable/3594173)

Suggested resources:

 

net neutrality

black Angora cat sitting on a stand
From Biggle pet book : a collection of information for old and young whose natural instincts teach them to be kind to all living creatures / by Jacob Biggle (1900)

86th chat, Monday July 24 2017: net neutrality
11am Pacific / noon Mountain / 1pm Central / 2pm Eastern

moderated by @mfgaede @bembrarian
Storify by @mfgaede

This chat is based around net neutrality, primarily focusing on the context of recent governmental decisions/stances and organizational responses regarding net neutrality laws, with net neutrality literacy and net neutrality education being primary themes/talking points. The goal of this chat is to show what libraries are actively doing and thinking now, and what next steps are needed to follow-up on these issues.

As an extension of December 2015’s “Privacy Education in Libraries” #critlib chat, we will also continue to gauge where libraries stand on privacy education, patron data, and vendor/technology relationships (and their transparency or lack thereof).

Suggested resources:

Discussion questions:

  • Q1. How does net neutrality relate to equity and how is it a social justice issue? #critlib
  • Q2. What is/should be libraries/library workers’ role(s) in the conversation about net neutrality? #critlib
  • Q3. What are effective resources for exploring/explaining net neutrality that have you have successfully shared in your library? #critlib
  • Q4. How do you balance providing service, using patron data for better service, and protecting users’ privacy? #critlib
  • Q5. How is data valued at your library? Do you know what your vendors do with your data? Do these factors affect vendor choice? #critlib

Additional resources:

privilege in the library job search process

From The Angora cat : how to breed, train and keep it / edited by Robert Kent James (1898)

85th chat, Tuesday July 11 2017: privilege in the library job search process
6pm Pacific / 7pm Mountain / 8pm Central / 9pm Eastern

Moderated by @kevinseeber @catladylib @ForgetTheMaine @modbrarian @christinemmoe
Storify by @kevinseeber

Jargon/concepts/shorthand to know ahead of time:

  • MPOW = “my place of work”
  • FPOW = “former place of work”
  • CV = “curriculum vitae”; these are frequently required for academic library positions in place of a resume.
  • cover letter = document to accompany to resume/CV that speaks to specific parts of the job listing.
  • job talk = also known as a “candidate presentation,” this is a common part of the interview process in which the person interviewing has to give a presentation to a room full of people.

Suggested readings:

Discussion questions:

  • Q1. How does the library job search process and hiring for “fit” reinforce hegemonic cultural expectations? #critlib
  • Q2. What should search committees/hiring authorities be doing differently when recruiting, interviewing, & hiring library workers? #critlib
  • Q3. Job searching involves lots of emotions. How can we address them in a healthy way, esp. given pessimism in the larger field? #critlib
  • Q4. What can experienced library workers do to help job seekers with less library experience? #critlib
  • Q5. If you started a new job in the last year, what advice can you offer job seekers looking for their first position? #critlib

relevance of MLIS to 21st century librarianship

head and upper torso of a striped shorthair cat looking at viewer
From Bird friends : a complete bird book for Americans / by Gilbert H. Trafton

84th chat, Monday June 19 2017: relevance of MLIS to 21st century librarianship
11am Pacific / noon Mountain / 1pm Central / 2pm Eastern

Moderated by @mohamedberray

Note: Using “MLIS” for any information/library master’s degree (MLS, MSIS, etc.) for brevity’s sake.

Suggested readings:

Discussion questions:

  • Q1. What are the most valuable applications of an MLIS degree to librarian practice? #critlib
  • Q2. What aspects of librarianship can be performed without the need for an MLIS? #critlib
  • Q3. What alternatives to a full two+ year MLIS degree could provide an entry to the profession?  #critlib
  • Q4. What changes could be made to MLIS programs to make them more relevant/worthwhile? #critlib
  • Q5. How can library workers & library schools work together to ensure the value of MLIS programs? #critlib

 

queer communities in academic libraries

black and white photo of two tabby cats
From Our domestic animals, their habits, intelligence and usefulness / by Gos de Voogt (1907)

83rd chat, Tuesday June 6 2017: queer communities in academic libraries
6pm Pacific / 7pm Mountain / 8pm Central / 9pm Eastern

Moderated by @infinity_dots & @brinepond
Storify by @infinity_dots

Queer – we’re using the term queer as an umbrella term for anyone who identifies as LGBTQIA+.

Suggested readings:

Discussion questions:

  • Q1. What do you do (or plan to do) to support queer communities on your campus? #critlib
  • Q2. Looking @ Q1 who’s being left out? (due to race, ethnicity, age, socioeconomic status, non-trad students, +) #critlib
  • Q3. What can librarians do to show support for transgender students, fac, staff in particular? #critlib
  • Q4. Has anyone surveyed students, fac, staff to determine queer needs on campus?#critlib
  • Q5. Moving forward what do you consider to be a primary need for the queer communities on your campuses? #critlib

endangered data

white short-haired cat
From Mammals of other lands / Charles J. Cornish [and others], editors (1917)
82nd chat, Monday April 17 2017: endangered data
6pm Pacific / 7pm Mountain / 8pm Central / 9pm Eastern*
*note special Monday evening time

Moderated by @brandontlocke & @worldcatlady
Storify by @elotroalex

Endangered Data is data that is at risk of deletion, repression, mishandling, or lost, or data for which broad access is difficult or impossible.

Suggested readings:

Discussion questions:

  • Q1. What are some ways in which you are impacted by the collection & use of federal data? #critlib
  • Q2. What can we as information professionals do to preserve access to #endangereddata? #critlib
  • Q3. How do you define data literacy? #critlib
  • Q4. What skills & literacies are required for engagement w/ open data & data-driven news and policies? #critlib
  • Q5. Do you teach infolit in a civic/social justice context (civic hackathons, ‘Fake News’)? #critlib

the future of ALA

tabby cat sitting on a fence
From Children and gardens / by Gertrude Jekyll (1908)

81st chat, Tuesday April 4 2017: the future of ALA
6pm Pacific / 7pm Mountain / 8pm Central / 9pm Eastern

Moderated by @MaxRenewals @bembrarian @violetbfox
Storify by @elwags

Just a reminder that if you’re an ALA member, elections end Wednesday April 5th. Please vote!

Discussion questions:

  • Q1. What’s your ALA story? How do you feel about ALA and how has your journey caused those feelings?
  • Q2. Do you feel participation in ALA is a/an (explicit or implicit) requirement for library professionals? Should it be?
  • Q3. How could ALA be made more valuable for non-MLIS-holding library workers?
  • Q4. What would you like to see ALA do that it’s not doing now?