Category Archives: Twitter chat

Melvil Dewey

drawing of two cats holding sticks, both wearing bows
From St. Nicholas vol. 27 no. 2 / edited by Mary Mapes Dodge (1899)

119th chat, Tuesday October 1 2019: Melvil Dewey
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @kevinseeber
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @kevinseeber

This chat will be a chance to reflect on the recently published Slate article on Melvil Dewey and his professional legacy from a critlib perspective.

acronyms explainer:

  • DDC = Dewey Decimal Classification
  • MD = Melvil Dewey

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. When did you first learn about Melvil Dewey’s racism/anti-semitism/misogyny? How did you learn about it? #critlib
  • Q2. In addition to the DDC, Melvil Dewey made a huge impact. In your daily work in libraries, or when you study libraries, where do you see evidence of his influence? #critlib
  • Q3. How can we address Dewey’s ongoing influence in libraries and repair some of the harm he caused? #critlib
  • Q4. Dewey was censured during his life, though librarianship continued to revere him (his name was attached to the ALA Lifetime Achievement award until 2019). Why is librarianship only just now coming to terms with this legacy? #critlib
  • Q5. The example of Melvil Dewey indicates that librarianship often ignores its history. What resources would you recommend to help people learn more about how librarianship got to where it is today? #critlib

#snaprt joint chat

black and white photo of a cat nursing a kitten
From Our domestic animals, their habits, intelligence and usefulness / by Gos de Voogt (1907)

118th chat, Tuesday September 24 2019: #snaprt joint chat / labor issues in archives
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @kcrowe
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

a joint chat between critlib and the Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) section of the Society of American Archivists (SAA)

note: Some of these questions may be difficult to answer candidly in a public forum like Twitter. Participants have a number of options for anonymity: you can send a direct message to @SNAP_Section, send a message to the SNAP RT through the anonymous form on this page, or tweet via the @CritLib_anon twitter account through the anonymous form on this page.

suggested resources:

Please share additional resources using #snaprt or #critlib on Twitter or through the SNAP section SAA listserv.

discussion questions:

  • Q1. What can archivists & librarians do to create greater solidarity in our professions? #critlib #snaprt #critarch
  • Q2. How do short term-funded projects in libs & archives contribute to perpetuation of systemic oppression in the info professions? #critlib #snaprt #critarch
  • Q3. How can lib & archives orgs advocate for & mitigate harm to workers? #critlib #snaprt #critarch
  • Q4. How can archivists & libs shift the perception of contingent work as necessary? #critlib #snaprt #critarch
  • Q5. How can supervisors of early career libs & archivists support new profs re: labor issues? #critlib #snaprt #critarch

IDEAL ’19 follow-up

black & white photo of siamese cat lying down and looking at camera
From Elements of zoology, to accompany the field and laboratory study of animals / by Charles Benedict Davenport (1911)

117th chat, Tuesday August 27 2019: IDEAL ’19 follow-up
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @ralphratheriled @chelseaheinbach @foreverhoward
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

IDEAL ’19 (Advancing Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility in Libraries & Archives) was held August 6 -7, 2019 at The Ohio State University. Find many presentation slides on individual pages of the conference schedule. This chat is not affiliated with the conference, just a follow-up from participants and interested parties.

Note: Some of these questions may be difficult to answer candidly in a public forum like Twitter. Participants are encouraged to tweet anonymously if it seems prudent.

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. If you attended, why did you choose to go to #IDEAL19? If you weren’t able to attend, did you want to go? Why or why not? #critlib
  • Q2. What were some of the most meaningful sessions or programs you attended? What made them so great? Link to the session info if you can! #critlib
  • Q3. How do you plan to apply the things you learned about equity, diversity, inclusion, and accessibility from #IDEAL19 at your institution? #critlib
  • Q4. Regarding the conference itself, in what ways did #IDEAL19 practice equity, diversity, inclusion, and accessibility? #critlib
  • Q5. What were some of the best unofficial conference experiences you had that made IDEAL#19 special? #critlib

critical medical librarianship

illustration of cat sitting in front of large tea cup
From The real Latin Quarter / F. Berkeley Smith (1901)

116th chat, Thursday June 13 2019: critical medical librarianship: a joint #medlibs / #critlib chat
11 am Pacific / noon Mountain / 1 pm Central / 2 pm Eastern

moderated by @pat_devine @openpeonie @pfanderson
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @pfanderson

discussion questions:

  • Q1. What would critical medical librarianship look like and what might it encompass (e.g. social justice, health disparities)?
  • Q2. Can we use existing definitions of Critical Librarianship and translate to medical librarianship?

critcat subject headings appraisal

black and white striped cat looking at a painting of a cat in nature
From Our domestic animals, their habits, intelligence and usefulness / by Gos de Voogt (1907)

115th chat, Tuesday November 13 2018: critcat subject heading appraisal
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @MLeonStewart @OpOnions @RobinDesmeules @violetbfox
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

Instead of predetermined questions, the moderators will be hosting an informal discussion about how Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) are proposed and evaluated. Please read the chapter below and bring your questions and curiosity to the chat!

required reading:

going fee free

black and white photo of a kitten's face emerging from an overturned pitcher
From Kittens and cats : a book of tales / Eulalie Osgood Grover (1911)

114th chat, Monday October 22 2018: going fee free
11 am Pacific / noon Mountain /  1 pm Central / 2 pm Eastern

moderated by @CleverGirlReads
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. What are the rationales behind charging fines and fees in libraries? How effective are they in meeting those goals? #critlib
  • Q2. Which of our patrons are most directly affected by library fines and fees? In what ways do fines affect patron access to and perception of libraries? #critlib
  • Q3. What are some different strategies for trying to go fee-free? In which kinds of libraries would each strategy work best? #critlib
  • Q4. What apprehensions do you have about going fee-free? What challenges would you need to overcome if you wanted to implement fewer (or no) fees? #critlib

Hack Library School chat: LIS student and new library worker perspectives

black and white drawing of a cat and four kittens sitting in a circle
From Rhymes and jingles / by Mary Mapes Dodge (1882)

113th chat, Tuesday October 9 2018: Hack Library School chat: LIS student and new library worker perspectives
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @DatasBrain & @LibrarianLauraJ
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

in collaboration with Hack Library School

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. What should new or prospective students know about library school before they begin their programs? #critlib
  • Q2. What has been (or was) the most beneficial aspect of your library program? What aspect(s) of your library program experience could be improved? #critlib
  • Q3. How can library school students and new library workers work towards a more equitable and diverse librarianship? How are equity and diversity addressed (if at all) in your LIS courses? #critlib
  • Q4. Do you/did you have a mentor in library school? If so, what impact has it had on your school experience and/or your career? #critlib
  • Q5. What scares (scared) you the most about the job hunting process? If you’ve been through the job hunt and were successful, was there anything you feared that turned out not to be a big deal? #critlib

health literacy

black and white photo of two fluffy kittens sitting and looking at the camera
Mammals of other lands / Charles J. Cornish [and others] (1917)
112th chat, Tuesday September 4 2018: health literacy
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @akaur0
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. How would you define “health literacy”? How does promoting #healthliteracy fit into your library’s goals or into your own professional goals? #critlib
  • Q2. Health Literacy Month is in October, so Sept is a great time to ask if your library engages in #healthliteracy initiatives. If yes, what does your library do? If not, what would you like it to do? #critlib
  • Q3. Health literacy is important for the general public as well as for health science professionals. How can libraries encourage critical thinking & #healthliteracy skills in interactions between patients and healthcare providers? #medlibs #critlib
  • Q4. Where do you see an overlap between #healthliteracy and #critlib? #medlibs

organizational culture

black and white drawing of two cats sitting on a wooden chair
From St. Nicholas vol. 27 no. 10 / edited by Mary Mapes Dodge (1900)

111th chat, Tuesday August 21 2018: organizational culture
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @GingerReads
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

Note: Some of these questions may be difficult to answer candidly in a public forum like Twitter. Participants are encouraged to tweet anonymously if it seems prudent.

discussion questions:

  • Q1. What kind of organizational barriers are in place in libraries you’ve worked at? #critlib
  • Q2. How are difficult conversations or controversies handled at libraries you’ve worked at? #critlib
  • Q3. What are examples of effective workplace practices you’d like to see more in more libraries? #critlib
  • Q4. How do you build allies and networks within and outside of your organization to foster positive changes? #critlib
  • Q5. How do you encourage/develop/support leadership at every level/staff to lead from where they are? #critlib

responding to ALA

black and white photo of a black and white Angora cat sitting in a half-closed basket
From Biggle pet book : a collection of information for old and young whose natural instincts teach them to be kind to all living creatures / by Jacob Biggle (1900)

110th chat, Tuesday July 31: responding to ALA
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @schomj & @voxpopulare
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

background:

On June 26, ALA Council voted to accept proposed revisions to the meeting room policy with little discussion. These revisions added language saying the “hate speech” and “hate groups” cannot be excluded if libraries provide meeting space for other religious, civic, or social groups. On July 8, Tyler Vachon discovered this addition and posted concerns about it on twitter. An outcry arose, and on July 9 the hashtag #NoHateALA was created to organize opposition. In response, James LaRue of OIF (ALA’s Office of Intellectual Freedom) posted an explanation and later, due to confusion about when this addition was made, added a timeline of events. After hearing continued member concerns, IFC (ALA’s Intellectual Freedom Committee) created a working group to begin drafting new revisions. Meanwhile, some Councilors began work to call for a vote to rescind the June 26 changes and revert to the 1991 language while IFC works on revisions. On July 20, the Executive Committee voted to authorize a vote to rescind the June 26 revision. ALA Council currently is debating this proposal, with a vote scheduled for August 9-16.

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. How would you define “hate group” or “hate speech”? What do you think of SPLC’s definition of hate groups?
  • Q2. How do you think libraries can protect themselves, their patrons, and their workers when dealing with hate groups?
  • Q3. What are your thoughts on ALA Council’s response to the controversy around this issue?
  • Q4. What do you think would make ALA a more inviting organization? What do you think would make the conferences more useful?