Category Archives: Twitter chat

generous accountability in libraries

black and white photo of two longhair cats sitting on a table covered by a rug
From Persia past and present : a book of travel and research / by A. V. Williams Jackson (1906)

124th chat, Tuesday January 21 2020: generous accountability in libraries
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @itsuhLEEsuh @alwaysreed @A_meeksie
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) by @violetbfox

The first critlib chat from members of the ACRL 2020 President’s Program Planning Committee. The committee is looking for feedback to inform the directions the program will take at the ALA Annual conference in June 2020.

All library workers and LIS folks are invited to participate in this chat!

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. How do you interpret or define “generous accountability”? How does the use of the word “generous” change the connotation of the term “accountability,” and why? #critlib
  • Q2. What does generous accountability, to ourselves and our communities, look like as a daily practice? #critlib
  • Q3. How can we build and foster a culture of accountability into our workspaces? What conditions need to be in place to build this? #critlib
  • Q4. When we hold ourselves or each other accountable, how do we balance intentions and impact with care and generosity? #critlib
  • Q5. How do we decenter whiteness in the process of setting up systems of accountability? #critlib

toxic work environments

woodblock illustration of a striped mother cat nuzzling two kittens
From The life and labors of Charles H. Spurgeon / by Geo. C. Needham (1884)

123rd chat, Tuesday December 10 2019: toxic work environments
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @GingerReads
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) by @violetbfox

discussion questions:

  • Q1. What is a toxic work environment? Is that a useful term? Why or why not?
  • Q2. How do toxic work environments impact efforts to dismantle oppression in libraries?
  • Q3. How can individuals cope with a toxic work environment?
  • Q4. If you could offer advice to administrators/leaders/managers trying to shift a toxic work culture to a positive one, what would you say?
  • Q5. If you could offer advice to non-managerial workers trying to shift a toxic work culture to a positive one, what would you say?
  • Q6. What fundamental changes could be made to librarianship to prevent toxic work cultures from forming?

school counselors and library workers

black and white photo of a kitten with a distinctive black patch on its face
From The diseases of the cat / by J. Woodroffe Hill (1901)

122nd chat, Wednesday December 4 2019: school counselors and library workers collaboration
5:30 pm Pacific / 6:30 pm Mountain / 7:30 pm Central / 8:30 pm Eastern

moderated by @AngCleveland @lieberrian @kiddcounselor15

Collaborative chat with #scchat focusing on how librarians and school counselors can partner to support future-ready students. Please use the #scchat hashtag to collocate tweets during this chat!

discussion questions:

Q1. Let’s kick off #SCCHAT by sharing your favorite book OR a book you are reading right now!
Q2. What are school counselors and librarians doing to support college or career readiness?
Q3. How are the roles of school counselors and librarians similar?
Q4. Describe ways that school counselors and librarians can collaborate.
Q5. How can school counselors and librarians foster positive relationships between educators, families, and students?
Q6. Share a resource for social emotional learning.
Q7. School counselors, what advice do you have for librarians?
Q8. Librarians, what advice do you have for school counselors?
Q9. School counselors and librarians are often supporting others. Share your best self-care tips.

distressing materials in libraries

drawing of cat with arched back and mouse in front of a jar and plate
From Reading-literature first reader / adapted and graded by Harriette Taylor Treadwell and Margaret Free (1911)

121st chat, Tuesday November 19 2019: distressing materials in libraries
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @lizdecoster and @LenaGluck
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. What is the role of library records, especially archival descriptions, in documenting atrocity in relation to intergenerational trauma(s)? #critlib
  • Q2. Have members of your community ever expressed concern to you about upsetting visuals? Either displayed in the library or turned up in library books or databases? How have you responded? #critlib
  • Q3. How have you incorporated content warnings with your community to contextualize images that could be dehumanizing or distressing? What has gone well, or what might you try differently next time? #critlib
  • Q4. How does PTSD and other trauma-related disability impact the experience of education and work in archives, libraries, and similar institutions? #critlib

alternatives to policing in libraries

drawing of a long-haired light-colored cat's face
From Cyclopedia of farm animals / edited by L. H. Bailey (1922)

120th chat, Tuesday October 22 2019: alternatives to policing in libraries
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @LenaGluck
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

thanks to @ayoola_crayola for help with drafting questions

Note: Some of these questions may be difficult to answer candidly in a public forum like Twitter. Participants are encouraged to tweet anonymously if it seems prudent.

suggested resources:

suggested resources for low spoons / visual sharing:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. How does the presence of police, security officers, or other security personnel affect Black, Indigenous, and other people of color’s ability to freely and safely access your library’s resources and materials? What would have to be the case for BIPOC to be and feel safe in libraries? #critlib
  • Q2. How have you handled situations of sexual harassment, sexual assault, stalking, abuse, or other gendered violence (including anti-LGBTQ violence) in the library without involving security/police in the past? In an ideal workplace, how would you and other library staff handle these situations? #critlib
  • Q3: How have disability and health issues (including visible or audible symptoms, mental or physical health emergencies, perceived addiction or alcoholism, etc.) been criminalized in libraries where you have worked, and what is a health-based response that could have been used instead? #critlib
  • Q4. There have been increased threats of organized white nationalist and anti-LGBTQ violence in the past couple decades, including everything from verbal harassment to mass shootings. In the event of supremacists or a mass shooter targeting your library, what would have to be the case for you to feel safe and prepared without relying on police? #critlib
  • Q5. If you have succeeded in starting conversations with coworkers, or supervisors about alternative means to maintain library safety and behavioral boundaries without calling police, how did you do it? What was well received and what wasn’t? #critlib

 

image description of Alternatives to Police Poster Series:

[A series of posters in bold, bright colors with black text overlaid. 

The first is red and reads, “Some folks are on benches in the park. Imagine… …A city employee comes by and checks in to see if they need a place to sleep, food, water, or health care. An hour later, those who want a different place to sleep have one. Isn’t that public safety?”

The second is purple and reads, “Someone is talking to themselves on the bus. Imagine… …They ride the bus without being bothered. An hour later they are at their destination and going on with their day. Isn’t that public safety?” 

The third is yellow and reads, “Someone is behaving erratically & in harm’s way. Imagine… …Texting a number & an unarmed urgent responder trained in behavioral and mental health comes within 5 minutes. An hour later that person is safe & getting the support they need. Isn’t that public safety?”

The fourth is green and reads, “You don’t realize but your brake lights aren’t working. Imagine… …A city employee signals for you to pull over & says ‘Hey, how about I replace those lights for you right here so no one gets hurt?’ An hour later, both lights work & you’re at home. Isn’t that public safety?

The fifth is pink and reads, “You are experiencing intimate partner violence. Imagine… …Texting a number & a trauma informed crisis intervention specialist meets you in a safe place. An hour later you are working together to make a plan that will keep you safe long term. Isn’t that public safety?”

The sixth is green and reads, “Someone is selling drugs to youth who are overdosing. Imagine… …Being connected to a substance use service that intervenes in harmful drug transactions. Youth are supported in healthy outcomes & the seller takes accountability for harm. Isn’t that public safety?”

The seventh is orange and reads, “Your friends are intoxicated & fighting but you don’t want them to get in trouble. Imagine… …You call +311 and a crisis intervention team comes to your door. 1 hour later, your friends are sleeping it off at home. Isn’t that public safety?” 

The eighth is teal and reads, “Incidents of gun violence are rising in the neighborhood. Imagine… …A trauma informed crisis intervention team works with community activists to disarm and deescalate conflicts. People doing harm are connected to services that address the underlying problem. Isn’t that public safety?” 

The ninth is violet and reads, “You are experiencing a mental health crisis & afraid. Imagine… …You call +311 & a first responder trained in mental health comes to your door. 1 hour later, you are in a safe place with your consent, with plans for follow up care. Isn’t that public safety?”

The tenth is red and reads, “Someone seems to be snooping in car windows on your block. Imagine… …Calling your neighbors who are trained in self-defense & deescalation & approaching the person. An hour later the conflict is resolved & the person responsible is getting the support they need. Isn’t that public safety?”

End image description]

Melvil Dewey

drawing of two cats holding sticks, both wearing bows
From St. Nicholas vol. 27 no. 2 / edited by Mary Mapes Dodge (1899)

119th chat, Tuesday October 1 2019: Melvil Dewey
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @kevinseeber
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @kevinseeber

This chat will be a chance to reflect on the recently published Slate article on Melvil Dewey and his professional legacy from a critlib perspective.

acronyms explainer:

  • DDC = Dewey Decimal Classification
  • MD = Melvil Dewey

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. When did you first learn about Melvil Dewey’s racism/anti-semitism/misogyny? How did you learn about it? #critlib
  • Q2. In addition to the DDC, Melvil Dewey made a huge impact. In your daily work in libraries, or when you study libraries, where do you see evidence of his influence? #critlib
  • Q3. How can we address Dewey’s ongoing influence in libraries and repair some of the harm he caused? #critlib
  • Q4. Dewey was censured during his life, though librarianship continued to revere him (his name was attached to the ALA Lifetime Achievement award until 2019). Why is librarianship only just now coming to terms with this legacy? #critlib
  • Q5. The example of Melvil Dewey indicates that librarianship often ignores its history. What resources would you recommend to help people learn more about how librarianship got to where it is today? #critlib

#snaprt joint chat

black and white photo of a cat nursing a kitten
From Our domestic animals, their habits, intelligence and usefulness / by Gos de Voogt (1907)

118th chat, Tuesday September 24 2019: #snaprt joint chat / labor issues in archives
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @kcrowe
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

a joint chat between critlib and the Students and New Archives Professionals (SNAP) section of the Society of American Archivists (SAA)

note: Some of these questions may be difficult to answer candidly in a public forum like Twitter. Participants have a number of options for anonymity: you can send a direct message to @SNAP_Section, send a message to the SNAP RT through the anonymous form on this page, or tweet via the @CritLib_anon twitter account through the anonymous form on this page.

suggested resources:

Please share additional resources using #snaprt or #critlib on Twitter or through the SNAP section SAA listserv.

discussion questions:

  • Q1. What can archivists & librarians do to create greater solidarity in our professions? #critlib #snaprt #critarch
  • Q2. How do short term-funded projects in libs & archives contribute to perpetuation of systemic oppression in the info professions? #critlib #snaprt #critarch
  • Q3. How can lib & archives orgs advocate for & mitigate harm to workers? #critlib #snaprt #critarch
  • Q4. How can archivists & libs shift the perception of contingent work as necessary? #critlib #snaprt #critarch
  • Q5. How can supervisors of early career libs & archivists support new profs re: labor issues? #critlib #snaprt #critarch

IDEAL ’19 follow-up

black & white photo of siamese cat lying down and looking at camera
From Elements of zoology, to accompany the field and laboratory study of animals / by Charles Benedict Davenport (1911)

117th chat, Tuesday August 27 2019: IDEAL ’19 follow-up
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @ralphratheriled @chelseaheinbach @foreverhoward
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

IDEAL ’19 (Advancing Inclusion, Diversity, Equity, and Accessibility in Libraries & Archives) was held August 6 -7, 2019 at The Ohio State University. Find many presentation slides on individual pages of the conference schedule. This chat is not affiliated with the conference, just a follow-up from participants and interested parties.

Note: Some of these questions may be difficult to answer candidly in a public forum like Twitter. Participants are encouraged to tweet anonymously if it seems prudent.

suggested resources:

discussion questions:

  • Q1. If you attended, why did you choose to go to #IDEAL19? If you weren’t able to attend, did you want to go? Why or why not? #critlib
  • Q2. What were some of the most meaningful sessions or programs you attended? What made them so great? Link to the session info if you can! #critlib
  • Q3. How do you plan to apply the things you learned about equity, diversity, inclusion, and accessibility from #IDEAL19 at your institution? #critlib
  • Q4. Regarding the conference itself, in what ways did #IDEAL19 practice equity, diversity, inclusion, and accessibility? #critlib
  • Q5. What were some of the best unofficial conference experiences you had that made IDEAL#19 special? #critlib

critical medical librarianship

illustration of cat sitting in front of large tea cup
From The real Latin Quarter / F. Berkeley Smith (1901)

116th chat, Thursday June 13 2019: critical medical librarianship: a joint #medlibs / #critlib chat
11 am Pacific / noon Mountain / 1 pm Central / 2 pm Eastern

moderated by @pat_devine @openpeonie @pfanderson
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @pfanderson

discussion questions:

  • Q1. What would critical medical librarianship look like and what might it encompass (e.g. social justice, health disparities)?
  • Q2. Can we use existing definitions of Critical Librarianship and translate to medical librarianship?

critcat subject headings appraisal

black and white striped cat looking at a painting of a cat in nature
From Our domestic animals, their habits, intelligence and usefulness / by Gos de Voogt (1907)

115th chat, Tuesday November 13 2018: critcat subject heading appraisal
6 pm Pacific / 7 pm Mountain / 8 pm Central / 9 pm Eastern

moderated by @MLeonStewart @OpOnions @RobinDesmeules @violetbfox
Wakelet (compilation of tweets) (pdf) by @violetbfox

Instead of predetermined questions, the moderators will be hosting an informal discussion about how Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH) are proposed and evaluated. Please read the chapter below and bring your questions and curiosity to the chat!

required reading: